Tech companies need to tackle motion sickness, and fast

TECHRADAR, JULY 2018

Whether you think driverless cars are the future of transportation or just another tech fad, it’s a fact that autonomous car technology is becoming more advanced, and more commonplace, by the day.

Every week it seems there’s a new development in the driverless car space, and pretty much every car manufacturer, tech company and ride-sharing service is investing in the industry, from Uber and Waymo to Mercedes and Tesla.

According to UK Business and Energy Secretary Greg Clark, the driverless car market could be worth more than £63 billion ($83 billion) to the global economy by 2035, and truly driverless cars are closer to becoming an everyday sight on our roads than many people might think. 

It’s not hard to see why autonomous cars are appealing. From making roads safer and saving energy through to improving mobility and giving you time to focus on other things rather than driving, there are all kinds of benefits. 

However, as you’d expect from any new kind of technology, there are plenty of problems too. Most notably, there have been several high-profile accidents, some of them fatal, involving driverless cars, including Tesla’s Model X crash and an Uber public self-driving test that led to a pedestrian fatality.  

Ensuring driverless cars are safe is of the utmost importance if they’re to be rolled out on a wider scale. But there’s also another concern that may not seem as pressing right now, but which could have a huge effect on public uptake of autonomous vehicles: motion sickness.

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